As the year is coming to an end I was thinking how it’s easy to ‘get in a pickle’ when it comes to finding your way. I thought I better get the exact meaning because I tend to misinterpret these old sayings

Off to Google I went to find where the term ‘in a pickle’ came from and how it translates. I found the first written use of “pickle” when it meant to be in a difficult situation was in a poem from 1562. That is how I interpret the phrase, like a baseball game when the runner is ‘caught in a pickle’.

Shakespeare gets credited with inventing the phrase “in a pickle” in The Tempest, but he uses it as a term for being pickled or drunk. In 1660 Samuel Pepys wrote, At home with the workmen all the afternoon, our house being in a most sad pickle. That sounds overwhelming!

The word “pickle” itself comes from the Dutch “pekel,” which refers to the pickling brine. The Dutch phrase in de pekel zitten literally means ‘to sit in the pickle brine’. I think this sums up how I feel about getting myself in a pickle, I’m fermenting in pickle juice!

I guess it’s like making lemonade out of lemons though that may be a stretch. I want to be sure the next I find myself in a pickle I slice it up and have it enhance my life, not sit and soak in the bottom of a bucket of vinegar and sourness.

#pickle #swinerypickles #livinglarge #dreambig #selfhelp #positiveattitude #makegoals #beflexible #gmcmotorhome #homeiswhereyouparkit #dream #retirement #prepare #behappy #pickthepath

https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/pop-culture/article/origin-of-the-phrase-in-a-pickle

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: